Reflections on a crazy half-year

It was back in September when I left my home, friends, and family in Europe to teach English in Ecuador. At that time, I had no idea what to expect – I’d signed up for a teaching job in a city that I’d never heard of with a school that, let’s be honest, was an …

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Should you bother visiting Puno?

Puno is on the shores of the brilliantly named Lake Titicaca, the highest navigable lake in the world. My first thought when I arrived in the drab town was that this was a good thing, as sailing was just one more way that I could leave as soon as possible. Heading south through Peru, everyone …

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A trip to Lago Sandoval

After spending 4 days in the jungle, I decided for some reason that I hadn’t seen quite enough animals. Waking up to the sun shining made me feel I’d be wasting my last day in Puerto Maldonado if I didn’t do something, so I quickly booked a tour to Lago Sandoval, just 15 minutes before …

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Tambopata: Peru’s corner of the Amazon.

Since leaving my job in Ecuador and having to choose between visiting the Galapagos Islands or going to the Amazon before my visa ran out, heading into the jungle had been something I hadn’t wanted to miss during my time in South America. Almost 4 months later, the dream became a reality in Tambopata, in …

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A night time walk in the Tambopata jungle.

“Be very careful when we are in the jungle. In this part, we have bullet ants, poison frogs, and venomous snakes. There are also tarantulas,” explained our guide Rodrigo, who would be leading us on a night walk from our lodge in Tambopata national reserve, which is thought to hold 10% of the world’s known …

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Q’eswachaka, the last grass bridge of the Inca Empire

I can only assume that Q’eswachaka, the last remaining Inca grass bridge, is still swaying over the Apurimac River because the Spanish couldn’t find the bastard thing when they invaded. There used to be hundreds of grass bridges on the Inca trail, helping people and their llamas get across deep gorges, ravines, and rushing rivers. …

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How to make pesqué de quinua and a visit to a traditional chichería.

In my post about Pisac a few weeks ago, I wrote that I wasn’t a massive fan. After another 4 days in the village, the centre still hasn’t won me over. However, feeling that I needed to get out of cities for a while, I found a great little casa del campo (country house, but not …

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